The Evolution of Cryptography: From DES to AES

pago
4 min readApr 6, 2023

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Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

Cryptography is an ever-evolving field, and the standards that govern it must keep up with the latest technological advancements to ensure secure communication. In this blog post, we will explore the evolution of cryptography standards from the Data Encryption Standard (DES) to the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), discussing the technical details and security implications of each standard.

Data Encryption Standard (DES)

The Data Encryption Standard (DES) was introduced in 1977 by the US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and quickly became the most widely used encryption standard in the world. DES is a block cipher that uses a 64-bit block size and a 56-bit key. The algorithm uses a Feistel cipher structure, which involves multiple rounds of substitution and permutation operations on the input data.

Despite its widespread use, DES eventually became outdated and insecure due to the limited key size. In 1997, a group of researchers demonstrated the ability to crack DES encryption in less than a day using specialized hardware. This led to the development of the Triple DES (3DES) encryption algorithm, which used a 168-bit key and performed three rounds of DES encryption.

Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) was introduced in 2001 as a successor to DES. AES is a block cipher that uses a 128-bit block size and key sizes of 128, 192, or 256 bits. The algorithm uses a substitution-permutation network (SPN) structure, which involves multiple rounds of substitution, permutation, and linear operations on the input data.

The development of AES involved a public competition organized by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in which encryption algorithms were evaluated based on their security, performance, and other factors. AES was chosen as the winner of the competition due to its excellent security and performance characteristics.

Comparison between DES and AES

Here are some of the key technical differences between DES and AES:

Key size

  • DES uses a 56-bit key, which provides only 2⁵⁶ possible combinations.
  • AES uses key sizes of 128, 192, or 256 bits, which provide 2¹²⁸, 2¹⁹², and 2²⁵⁶ possible combinations, respectively.
  • A larger key size provides greater security against brute-force attacks.

Block size

  • DES uses a 64-bit block size, which can lead to vulnerabilities such as block collisions.
  • AES uses a 128-bit block size, which provides greater security against various types of attacks.

Algorithm structure

  • DES uses a Feistel cipher structure, which involves multiple rounds of substitution and permutation operations on the input data.
  • AES uses a substitution-permutation network (SPN) structure, which involves multiple rounds of substitution, permutation, and linear operations on the input data.

The evolution of cryptography standards from DES to AES highlights the importance of regularly updating encryption standards to keep up with the latest technological advancements and security threats. DES, once widely used, became outdated and insecure due to its small key size. The introduction of AES, with its larger key and block sizes and better algorithm design, has provided a much more secure encryption standard that can withstand modern-day attacks. As technology continues to advance, it is crucial to continue improving and updating encryption standards to ensure secure communication.

6 practical use case

Photo by Petter Lagson on Unsplash
  1. Online Banking: Online banking platforms use cryptography to ensure the confidentiality and integrity of sensitive financial information being transmitted over the internet. AES is commonly used for encryption of banking transactions.
  2. E-Commerce: E-commerce websites rely on cryptography to ensure secure online transactions. AES encryption is used to encrypt sensitive data such as credit card numbers and personal information.
  3. Virtual Private Networks (VPN): VPNs are used to provide secure and private connections over the internet. Encryption is a vital component of VPNs, with AES being a common encryption standard used in VPNs.
  4. Secure Email Communication: Email communication can be vulnerable to interception and eavesdropping. Cryptography is used to secure email communication, with AES encryption being a common standard for email encryption.
  5. Military and Government Communications: Military and government organizations use cryptography to protect classified and sensitive information. AES encryption is commonly used in these applications due to its high level of security.
  6. Healthcare: Healthcare organizations use cryptography to protect sensitive patient information, including medical records and personal information. AES encryption is commonly used in healthcare applications to ensure the confidentiality and privacy of patient data.

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pago

Proficient in authoring tools and has a keen eye for detail. Passionate about technical writing and always seeking to improve.